Magnificent metals

Magnificent metals

Activity

Materials Needed

 

 Introductory Activity

 

  • Fridge door
  • Any magnets that you may have at home (can be of different shapes, colours and sizes)
  • Basket, tray or container
  • Tape

 

 

 Focused Activity 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Feely bag/pouch (a large bag that can almost be sealed with drawstring)
  • Scraps of different cloth, like velvet, wool, cotton, or leather; metal objects, wooden spoons/toys, pieces of aluminum foil, any objects found the house with an interesting feel
  • “I Spy” Materials Activity Sheet (available for download)
  • Adjectives to describe materials flashcards (available for download)
  • Guess what’s in the bag prediction sheet (available for download)

 

 

 Bonus Challenge I

 

  • A selection of magnetic metal objects: paper clips, metal buttons, iron fillings, thumb tacks, magnetic bingo chips
  • A selection of non-magnetic objects: coins, plastic beads, pencil eraser, seashell, dice
  • 2 Bar magnets / Strong magnets
  • Magnetic vs. Non-magnetic sorting mat (available for download)
  • Vocabulary flashcards (available for download)
  • Magnetic Poles - Attract or Repel Activity Sheet (available for download)

 

 

 Bonus Challenge II

 

 

  • Paper plate
  • Strong magnet
  • Metal objects: screws, nuts and bolts, paper clips
  • Paint/s (any color)

 

 

 Sensory Play

 

 

 

  • Empty container
  • Black beans
  • Aluminium foil sheets
  • Sensory exploration printable: includes astronauts and other space-related images (available for download)
  • Paper clips to make a stand for the images (video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IfX4UgwMPcw)
  • Tape
  • Metal objects such as metal bowl, spoon, fork, cookie tins etc
  • Magnets previously used in the Introduction activity

 

Introduction : Magnificent Metals

Objectives

  1. Exploring with magnets and their magnetic properties

  2. Identify lowercase ‘m’ and uppercase ‘M’ for magnets

 

Materials Needed

  • Fridge door

  • Any magnets that you may have at home (can be of different shapes, colours and sizes)

  • Basket, tray or container

  • Tape

 

Directions

Prep:

  • Place all magnets in a basket, tray or container

  • Print and cut out the number cards

    • This is for the second activity

 

Activity 1:

  • Place basket of magnets by the fridge door

  • Invite child to transfer the magnets from the basket to the fridge door

  • As he/she does this, prompt child to describe the magnet

    • What colour is this magnet? What shape is it? Is it bigger or smaller than that one there?

  • Optional: Invite child to sort the magnets into different groups based on their shape, size or colour

 

Activity 2:

  • Use the tape to form the lowercase ‘m’ on the fridge door

  • Encourage child to place the magnets on the tape lines

  • Once complete, point out the lowercase ‘m’ to child and reinforce ‘m’ for magnets

    • You may also sound out: ‘m’ makes the sound ‘mmmmmm’ and ‘magnets have the beginning sound mmmmm’

 

Activity 3:

  • Use the tape to form the uppercase ‘M’ on the fridge door

  • Point out to child how this ‘M’ looks different from this ‘m’

  • Invite child to place the magnets on the tape lines

 

Focused Activity: Materials All Around Us

Objectives 

1. Describe and group materials by texture and properties.

2. Use adjectives to describe attributes of objects (e.g. color, size) and to make comparisons (soft/hard)

3. Count objects reliably, up to a collection of 5 or more.

 

Materials Needed

  • Feely bag/pouch (a large bag that can almost be sealed with drawstring)

  • Scraps of different cloth, like velvet, wool, cotton, or leather; metal objects, wooden spoons/toys, pieces of aluminum foil, any objects found the house with an interesting feel

  • “I Spy” Materials Activity Sheet (available for download)

  • Adjectives to describe materials flashcards (available for download)

  • Guess what’s in the bag prediction sheet (available for download)

 

Directions

Prep:

  • Place a variety of objects into a feely bag/pouch.

 

Activity:

  • Invite your child to place his/her hands inside and feel and describe the different textures. Can they guess what is inside? Your child may record his/her predictions in the observation sheet provided.

> First, your child will place his/her hand into the bag and write a few lines about how does the object feel.

> Next, have him/her write his predictions of what the object is.

> After your child has made his/her prediction, check what’s inside and draw the object inside the bag on the prediction sheet provided.

  • It may be helpful to help your child sort the different materials into categories like fabric, wood, plastic and metal.

  • Introduce different properties of each material to your child using the flashcards provided.

  • Extension: have your child engage in a game of “I Spy” and count the number of fabric/paper/wood/plastic/glass/metal objects on the activity sheet.

 

Bonus Challenge I: Magnet Cleanup

Objectives

1. Children will learn which objects are attracted to a magnet and which are not. They will also practice skills of classifying and sorting.

 

Materials Needed

  • A selection of magnetic metal objects: paper clips, metal buttons, iron fillings, thumb tacks, magnetic bingo chips

  • A selection of non-magnetic objects: coins, plastic beads, pencil eraser, seashell, dice

  • 2 Bar magnets / Strong magnets

  • Magnetic vs. Non-magnetic sorting mat (available for download)

  • Vocabulary flashcards (available for download)

  • Magnetic Poles - Attract or Repel Activity Sheet (available for download)

 

Directions

Prep:

  • Scatter all the metal objects onto the table and ask your child to help you “clean up” by using the magnets to pick up different objects and sort them into containers.

 

Activity:

  • As your child picks up the different materials with the magnet, have him/her place the materials onto the magnetic/non-magnetic sorting mats accordingly.

  • You may like to introduce vocabulary such as “attract” and “repel” at this point using the vocabulary flashcards available for download.

  • Extension: Guide your child to fill up the attract or repel activity sheet available for download. You could have 2 bar magnets on hand to aid in the filling up of this activity sheet.

> The two ends or sides of a magnet are called poles.

> When two ends of a magnet pull together, they attract. (Similarly, the north pole of a magnet will always attract to the south pole of another magnet.)

> When two ends of a magnet push away, they repel. (Similarly, if two north poles or two south poles are put together, they will repel each other. When this happens, the magnets will move away from each other.)

> With varying examples stated on the activity sheet, your child will decide if each pair of magnet will attract or repel each other by circling the appropriate vocabulary terms.

 

Bonus Challenge II: Magnet Art

Objectives

  1. Learning how magnets can be used to move objects.

 

Materials Needed

  • Paper plate

  • Strong magnet

  • Metal objects: screws, nuts and bolts, paper clips

  • Paint/s (any color)

 

Directions

Prep:

  • Put a few drops of paint on top of the paper plate along with a few metal objects.

  • You may find thinning the paint with a little water will make the objects glide through the paint easier.

 

Activity:

  • Have your child hold the paper plate in one hand and a magnet under the paper plate.

  • Have your child “paint” by slowly moving the magnet and dragging the metal objects around through the paint.

  • Tips and tricks:

> Instead of squeezing paint onto the paper plate, place the paint into bowls. Have your child drop the desired metal object into the paint. He/she can then pick up the objects they want and drop them on their painting surface. This makes the activity more child-led.

> Ensure that you keep the magnet against the paper plate to prevent paint objects from dropping to the table.

> You may find that as the metal object becomes more covered in paint, it is harder to move through the paint. To curb this, you can either wash the paint off the object or thin the paint with a little water.

> Bear in mind that the focus of this activity is the process! The finished products are a colorful abstract mass of metal object tracks in which your child will love them!

 

Sensory Play : Planet of Metals Sensory Bin

Objectives

  1. Recognising objects that are made of metal

  2. Reinforcing the magnetic element of metals

 

Materials Needed

  • Empty container

  • Black beans

  • Aluminium foil sheets

  • Sensory exploration printable: includes astronauts and other space-related images (available for download)

  • Paper clips to make a stand for the images (video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IfX4UgwMPcw)

  • Tape

  • Metal objects such as metal bowl, spoon, fork, cookie tins etc

  • Magnets previously used in the Introduction activity

 

Directions

Prep:

  • Pour out black beans into an empty container

  • Print and cut the images from the sensory bin printable

    • Watch the video to know how to make a paper clip stand

    • Tape the back of the cut-out images to the upright portion of the stand

    • Your images should be able to stand freely

  • Place the metal objects in a tray for child to access during activity

 

Activity 1:

  • Prompt child to pick out the metal objects from the tray and place them into the sensory bin

    • At the same time, point out how metal can be used to make different objects for different purposes

  • Allow child to freely explore with the metal objects. Suggested prompts:

    • Scoop the beans into the bowl or tin, stir it round and hear all the different sounds it makes before pouring it out

    • Pretend to play a drum and make sounds by hitting the spoon/fork on the metal bowl or tin

 

Activity 2:

  • Add the prepared astronauts and space-related images into the bin of metal objects

  • Prompt child to describe how the sensory bin looks like now

    • What does this look like now? Does it look like a planet in space?

  • To make space rocks, demonstrate crushing the aluminium foil sheet to into a ball

  • Then allow child to make more space rocks by crushing more aluminium sheets

  • Add in some magnets and set a context of play for your child: The astronauts have discovered an interesting element on this planet and are trying to to find out what it is

  • Child can move the astronauts and the various cut-outs around in the bin to demonstrate space exploration

  • Suggested prompts during play to recall concepts learnt in this theme:

    • What material did they find?

    • How does it work together with the magnets?

    • Can they be used to make different things?